Author: Torchlight

The Apathy of Indifference

Would you believe me if I told you there was something horribly wrong with this world? A cancer, so malignant, that it’s caused many Christ-followers to lose sight of Him and to think God has abandoned the world? We are a nation of apathy. We are a nation of sin. We are a nation where good men and women wonder where their next meals will come from. We are a nation where parents fearfully wait for a phone call telling them their child has been slain. We are a nation where people are still fighting the race war in a post-Civil Rights era. We are a nation where men and women who are paid to protect and serve, mete out their own cowboy justice. Note, this is not all or even most, but it exists. Finally, we are a nation where hatred prevails and people only want to get involved when individual choice has been removed.

I had a friend tell me recently that those within the New Age movement and those who do not adhere to Christianity are performing the wonders, Christ-followers should be. They prophesize and perform miracles. They pursue the self above all things. My friend saw Christianity as weaker, as not having the strength these other religions have anymore. I understand my friend’s fears. But, let me be clear. God is not playing for spectacles. He is not the next sensational thing. He’s been playing the long game since the dawn of creation.

Let’s look at some scripture for a moment.

1 Chronicles 29:11 (ESV) says, “Yours, O Lord, is the greatness and the power and the glory and the victory and the majesty, for all that is in the heavens and in the earth is yours. Yours is the kingdom, O Lord, and you are exalted as head above all.”

Galatians 3:28 (ESV) says, “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”

1 Peter 2:15 (ESV) also tells us, “For this is the will of God, that by doing good you should put to silence the ignorance of foolish people.”

Basically, our Father has got this and we need to have faith in Him. God does not promise comfort. He does promise to shelter us when we have faith. And, we are commanded to love others. What I’ve seen lately is a lack of love. A lack of human compassion. I have seen men and women belittle others for using precautions. I have witnessed men and women spew filth because someone looked different than they do. Is this of God? Are we really of God when we let our fellow human beings perish beneath the boot of oppression? Ecclesiastes 9:3 (ESV) reveals “This is an evil in all that is done under the sun, that the same event happens to all. Also, the hearts of the children of man are full of evil, and madness is in their hearts while they live, and after that they go to the dead.”

We have a sin problem. We cannot just sit by and permit God’s enemies to take over. By following Jesus, we are called to a radical change. And if we are all equal in God’s eyes, if we all are flawed and must go through the Son to get to the Father, then there is no justification for the evil we see. So, I am urging you, my friends, let’s stand up for what’s right. Let’s not turn a blind eye until evil is poking us squarely in the chest. Let’s help turn things around so His kingdom overshadows the fear so prevalent in these troubled times.

I’m here for you. Let’s start a radical shift in mentality and imbibe our hearts with the holy spirit. Let’s devote our hearts and lives to God. Francis of Assisi once said, “Start by doing what’s necessary; then do what’s possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” Let’s start with faith. Let’s start with love. If we put our trust in Him and embrace Jesus’s presence in our hearts, we will see change. We will see hungry men fed. We will see a powerful shift in our public perceptions. We will see ourselves as the tribe of God and soldiers in the war against evil. It’s time to act. It’s time to arm ourselves with the Holy Spirit and shed our apathy. It’s time to take up the sword of Christ and smite our animosity. Live in love. Dwell in the Father. Amen.

Our Stumbling Block

Life presents each of us with a series of events, ranging from the mundane to the extraordinary, that defines who we are. We move from one day to the next, drawing on hindsight for clarity. Humans are incapable of absolute purity, absolute sinlessness, while we traverse this earth. So we get distracted. So we turn aside from the call Jesus has on our lives. The devil’s in the details, right? We are- we should be- better than this.
We are stumbling. As Christians, we know it is likely we will stumble off and on for the rest of our mortal lives. That’s why there is a need for repentance. It is not to provide an excuse- a spiritual loophole if you will. No, it is so we can honestly beseech the Father, our Lord and God, for His mercy and grace. It is our acknowledgement of wrongdoing and the desire to change. Now this is important to keep in mind as we talk about some ugly things.
But first-
Lately, the world has been plagued with a health pandemic that has affected millions, whether through death, economic hardship, social isolation, etc. People have reacted to this in numerous ways, not all of which are good. Regardless of whether you see it as a hoax or as legitimate. Regardless of where your concern for the health and well-being of others lies. Regardless of these, and ugliness has reared its thorny head. Galatians 5:13 tells us “For you were called to freedom brothers. Only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another.” Likewise, Proverbs 24:16 says, “For though a righteous man falls seven times, he will rise again, but the wicked stumble into calamity.” A much bigger crisis rears its head. It is the absence of human decency and compassion in many forums.
Let’s talk about social media. How often do you read the comments to an article, only to see hateful, angry rhetoric? How often do we see people belittle others because they do not see things exactly how someone else does? I’ll be honest. I have been a member of Christian groups, writing groups, art groups, gaming groups… you expect to see people who only want to stir the pot, just to get any sort of response. We call them trolls in this digital age. But do you know where I saw the most appalling dialogues? Christian groups. From self-professing Christians. I will not discount the good, but there is too much hateful dialogue and rhetoric present for anyone claiming to serve God.
I will not share what I have seen, as it is something you can see for yourself, but there are three things I want to communicate.

  1. No one has the authority to judge the depth of one’s faith. We are commanded to help guide people to Jesus, to make disciples in His name, but we can never know the full depths of someone’s relationship with God.
  2. Hateful rhetoric is not Christlike. Even if you are right, no amount of demeaning talk will make it good. Harshness is one thing. Jesus was harsh. Hatefulness is another. Do all things in love.
  3. We do not know God’s mind. He’s God. We aren’t built to fathom all the threads He holds to bring a given moment to fruition. We can guess. We can take His words that were laid out in the Bible, but we do not and cannot know all.
    James 1:26 tells “If anyone thinks he is religious and does not bridle his tongue but deceives his heart, this person’s religion is worthless.”
    Psalm 34:13 says, “Keep your tongue from evil and your lips from speaking deceit.”

Proverbs 10:19 also says, “When words are many, transgression is not lacking, but whoever restrains his lips is prudent.”
1 Corinthians 2:15-16 says, “The spiritual person judges all things, but is himself to be judged by no one. For who has understood the mind of the Lord so as to instruct him?” But we have the mind of Christ.
It is not wrong to hold people accountable. Through Christ, we are given more understanding into the mind of God. But we are held to a higher standard. We can disagree. We can discuss more Scripture-centered processes. We can question. We can even be angry. But we are not God and we cannot know every detail of someone. We cannot know just how much harm our ugly words do; whether they repel those who are not of the faith or they drive away those who are. Oh, I know these times are hard. We all deal with it in some way or another.
But if you think God’s body will not suffer because you belittled someone you disagreed with, if you got on your high horse and decided to mete out God’s judgement, well… maybe it’s time to open the Bible and get down on your knees. We are commanded to live lives focused on building God’s church. Not tearing it down. Throughout Scripture we are called to do things with love. Love can be harsh. Love can seem unkind. But love is not wicked. At least God’s love is not. So maybe, as we progress towards an uncertain future, we’ll draw on Him to better engage with others.

Who you are

  • 1 Corinthians 12:27 (ESV) – Now you are the body of Christ and individually members of it.
  • 1 Peter 2:9 (ESV) – But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.
  • Genesis 1:27 (ESV) – So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female, he created them.

God knows who you are. He knew all of you before the first beam of light teased the horizon. He knew all your secrets before your very first breath. He doesn’t stop knowing because you stumble or turn away from Him. And, because He knows and loves – He loves you!– the person you are, the person you were, and the person He molds you into, take comfort. God loves all mankind; otherwise, He wouldn’t have sent His son. Remember John 3:16? It doesn’t say any one person or social group. No, God so loved the world. And honestly, that’s made all the difference.

But sometimes, we get lost in our own lives. We stop believing God loves us, because each of us strives to be so different from our neighbors. Or, we stop loving ourselves. Sometimes, we hear all the other voices screaming they know us, that we are this thing or that. To our fellow human, we are the whore, the cynic, the coward, the zealot, the narcissist, the prude, the- well, you get the idea. We adopt labels to make us palatable or pariahs to the surrounding world. When we focus on these, we often lose sight of who our Father knows we are.

Think about one of the biggest stumbling blocks Christians face when trying to connect with non-believers. Hypocrisy. There are numerous forms, but let’s address something- let’s call it the elephant in the room. We are all hypocrites. We are commanded to love one another, to show grace, and come to God with humbleness. But the truth is, we can often prove ill-tempered and graceless. We can interact with those whose presence simply irritates us and draws out unkind words. We may smash our fingers and vomit strings of profanity. We see a buffet and engorge ourselves. We are no better than anyone else.

Even so, Jesus called us to a higher standard; definitely a standard higher than the one the world would have us yield to. It’s because of this higher standard we are call to uphold that our hypocrisy becomes more apparent. Matthew 6:1 tells us to “Beware of practicing your righteousness before other people in order to be seen by them, for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven” (ESV). Humans are fundamentally sinful creatures, who strive for the perfection found in Christ (well, if they have given their lives over to Him). Because we are sinful and prone to old routines, it’s occasionally possible to offend others, right? No. No, we offend quite often. With that being said, we should remember that only Jesus is blameless. 2 Corinthians 5:21 (ESV) declares, “For our sake we made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.”

Romans 12:2 (ESV) commands, “Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed to the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.” We will never be good enough by the world’s standards. There will always be some measure we fall short of. Our parents, partners, friends… they will not always approve of our actions, but it is not always due to any shortcoming of our own. People are flawed. People are not God. So, when we talk about how the world sees us, we are absolutely talking about people. That’s not to say we shouldn’t strive for our best. We definitely should! Instead, we need to remember that God and only God knows all of us. Don’t you think if we actually weren’t good enough, He’d have told us already? Do not misunderstand me. We are undeserving of the grace He shows us. That’s why it’s grace and not something we are owed or entitled to. We are loved by Him, despite our flaws. He judges our sin, but welcomes us into His arms when we choose to believe in His son. That’s not conforming to the world. That’s clinging to the higher standards He lays before us.

So here are my recommendations. When you look at yourself in the mirror and start to hear the multitude, remember that our Father knows you. Turn to His gospel. Pray. Live the Christ-fueled life. Hold yourself accountable and if you find that you’re doing things God’s words tell us are wrong, repent. Because in the end, who we are, who we should aspire to be, are the Children of God.

God’s Higher Standard

In Matthew 5. Jesus calls us to be better than the world. He says, “For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished. Therefore, whoever releases one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven. For I tell you, unless your righteousness exceeds that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven (17-20 ESV). Moses laid out the laws in the Old Testament. Jesus made it so much harder to keep to God’s law with what he said in the text following verse 20. As sinful creatures, we cannot possibly keep God’s law 100% of the time. That’s where Jesus swoops in and covers us. We are held to this higher standard, but He paid the price when He died on the cross and rose from the grave.

It is infinitely more important to know and accept that Jesus died for us than it is to keep to the old covenant. That is not to say that following the standards laid out for us throughout scripture is not important. On the contrary, it is very important. But Jesus is the WHOLE point. His sacrifice was the fulfillment of prophecy and He is the only doorway to the Father’s kingdom. So don’t you think Jesus Christ is absolutely more important than… well, anything? I’d say so!

Ah, but we live in the world. We have social media and magazines emphasizing toxic self-image. Have we considered the damage things like Photoshop and SnapChat filters have done to our self-esteem? We hear we are not good enough. We hear that we aren’t smart, pretty, whatever enough. These are distractions. Were we not worth the Son of God dying for us? (The answer is yes. Yes, we were and are.) We are better than the world because we stand on the side of righteousness. We stand on the side of the highest standard – God’s standard – and so our individual shortcomings really pale beside the awesome might of our Holy Father.

And yet, we human animals constantly disregard this in favor of the standards we find in the world If we are great at our jobs, we can earn that bonus or higher salary. If we are pretty enough, we can attract that new romantic partner. If we are quick enough, we can get to the store for that last roll of toilet paper. Because the world has its own standard, we lose sight of God’s standard. Ever is the power of rationalization as present as it is when we have another bill to pay. God’s commandments don’t carry the same weight when we have to scramble to make end’s meet just to keep the air conditioning running another month. How about when we have seen loved ones abused by those who should look out for their well-being? The world says we can achieve any dream, but really, most people are merely looking to get by.

We forget the Lord is still with us. He tells us, “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future” (Jeremiah 29:11). Brothers. Sisters. I tell you this. “Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong” (1 Corinthians 16:13 ESV). God has not abandoned us. This world is our testing ground. Until our last breath, we shall find things to distract us from the higher standard that comes by living a Christ-based life. Time will chip away at tour dedication. Not always with that devil on our shoulder either. No, more often than not, it will come in perceived necessity and when all cards appear stacked against us.

Have faith. Recenter daily. Pray for direction. And above all, remember that Jesus Christ died for us, so we do not have to live the proverbial checklist. Just accept Him and allow the Holy Spirit to transform your life. Because God’s standards are worth banking eternity on.

Hope in God’s Domain

It’s important to remember one thing. This is God’s domain. If this is God’s domain, then we know He is in control. Perhaps that is something we all should keep in mind. But we keep forgetting in these trying times. I get it. Times are scary. Some of us are isolated. Some are forced into interaction with others, risking onset of COVID-19. I am sorry for whatever you’re going through, but remember, this is God’s domain.

In Isaiah 41:10 we’re told, “So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.” Psalm 46:1 also says, “God is our refuge and strength, an ever-present help in trouble.” How about this from Philippians? “Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:6-7).

Far too often, we try to put ourselves on tier with God. Hey, I’m guilty of trying to exercise my own sense of control when the world- when life- throws another curveball. We cannot wrest control from our Father’s hands. No matter how strong we think we are, He is stronger. No matter how capable we are, He is so much more capable. Trust me when I tell you I know how hard it is to accept there is anything out of my control. But I am not God and when I submit to His grace, then I cannot truly claim helplessness. Do not be anxious. Do not hold to the might be’s and what ifs.

Many of us have plausible excuses for holding to news reports and social media posts. We need to know what’s going on in the world around us. We are social creatures who feel a compulsion to stay plugged in. I ask you this. Is it drawing us closer to God? Does berating others in the comments section that’s present pretty much everywhere showcase God in our life? God allows the negativity, but He does not condone the sin.

I think during these times we really need to focus on God’s word. We need to think on what is good and true. “Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable- if anything is excellent or praiseworthy- think about such things” (Philippians 4:8). Is God good? Nahum 1:7 says so. Mark 10:18, 1 Peter 2:3, Psalm 86:5- I could go on, but you see, He is so very good! And true. And noble. All these things. Certainly God and His Word is praiseworthy? In Revelation 4:11, we hear, “Worthy are you, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for you created all things, and by your will they existed and were created.” He certainly is praiseworthy!

When we start to grow restless and decide to venture out into the world, God is still deserving of our devotion. He doesn’t lose sovereignty simply because we are sick or going a bit stir crazy. We do not give God His sovereignty. It is and always has been His. He hasn’t lost control just because we can’t stand the way things are anymore. And you know what? When events settle down to where they seem less turbulent, He will still maintain just as much control as He does right now. Complete control.

That is what is good and right. He is our constant. He is our North Star. But it’s up to each of us to wade through life’s murky waters and clutch to Him. We’re in His domain, remember?

When We Do More Harm

Trigger warning: This is directed to people who fall under the “Christian” label.

  • “Do you know Jesus in your life?”
  • “Have you accepted Jesus into your heart?”
  • “Who is Jesus to you?”

At some point in our lives, we are asked a variation of those questions. Often, they are meant to initiate conversations between nonbelievers and Christ-followers. Sometimes, they are conversations between fellow Christ-followers. These dialogues can prove quite fruitful and to be sure, the conversation must start somewhere. We’ll touch on the positive interactions another time. For now, let’s talk about when Christians do more harm than good, though they mean well. It is a hard pill to swallow, but often, peoples’ issues with Christianity is not Jesus, but the people professing faith in Him.

But first, who does Jesus say He is?

  • Luke 22:70 – Then they all said, “Are You then the Son of God?” So He said to them, “You rightly say that I am.”
  • John 14:6 – I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father but by me.”
  • John 11:25 – Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life, He who believes in me will live, even though he dies; and whoever lives and believes in me will never die.”

Jesus didn’t- and still doesn’t- need help to tell who He is. We know he came to our mortal earth to not only take the burden of our sin by dying on the cross, but to defeat the grave three wonderful days later. Jesus is the blameless Son of the Most High God, part of the Holy Trinity- Father, Son, Holy Spirit. Jesus knows who He is. 

But do we? Moreover, are we confident in our knowledge of who He is? That is the personal question each person must answer for themselves. Let’s make certain assumptions about mindsets to provide a general baseline to proceed upon. To us- us being the average Christian- acceptance of the following is necessary.

  • Jesus is the Son of God.
  • Jesus is God.
  • Jesus came to die for us, to take on the mantle of sin, as payment for our sins.
  • Jesus is the only way to the Father.
  • Jesus rose from the grave, thereby defeating it.
  • Jesus is blameless.

Now that we have this baseline, let’s talk about a few items where many of us indicate room for improvement.

Item 1: No one’s relationship with God is more exalted than another’s.

Pride is sinful. Proverbs 11:2 says, “When pride comes, then comes shame; But with the humble is wisdom.” Proverbs 16:18 also says, “Pride goes before destruction, And a haughty spirit before a fall.” James 4:16 states, “But now you boast in your arrogance. All such boasting is evil.” We Christ-followers don’t always get it right. But we all fall short of the Glory of God. All of us. If we were perfect, there would have been no need for Jesus to come down to us, endure the crucifixion, and then return from the grave. So, we all have testimonies and none of them are the same. In fiction, it’s said that there are around 7 storylines or themes that exist, and that all stories are variations of one of at least one of the 7. How many human beings are on this planet? A lot. Each of us has a story. That story transforms into testimony when we take up the battle garb that is Christ. In that each is unique, it is also the same. It is a convergence on the single doorway: Jesus.

Even after we choose to follow Him, we’re still plagued by this sinful world. We still stumble. We still doubt from time to time. We’re imperfect creatures. But within the Christian community, there are some who exalt their stories, who make their walk with God seem much more profound than those around them. They call the doubts and another person’s walk with Him immature or foolish. Have you heard or experienced something like this? Let’s look at an example.

A young woman, single mother, survivor of spousal and familial abuse, has seen her life turn around in the last year. She grew up in church, but fell away for about 5 years. A year ago, she felt God speaking in her life again. She started going to church, has gotten involved, and interacts with people about her faith with increasing frequency. One night, she has a conversation with a longtime, Conservative, female churchgoer. The older woman asks her, “Who is Jesus to you?” The younger woman answers, using her past suffering and her recommitment to reinforce that Jesus is her salvation. She does not delve as deeply into scripture, does not have verse and passage to reinforce what she’s saying. The other does not like this answer. The longtime churchgoer, thinking she is meaning well, over-saturates the conversation with items to make the younger woman’s story seem childish, not as profound as the long-time churchgoer’s because she has more questions.

Sometimes, we forget that God wants all of us in His corner. We do more damage and honor Him less by making our walk seem more righteous than someone else’s. Look, we all misinterpret the Word sometimes. And we’re all at different points on our walk. We can never learn enough from God. There will always be more He can teach us. But, some of the specifics of what each of us needs to learn aren’t the same as the next person.

Item 2: Humans are not perfect. No Christian is perfect.

Think on your experiences with church. How many of us have seen those perfect people, who always seem to serve God the best way, who never seem to struggle with their faith, who always are on their p’s and q’s? Their perfection is an illusion. And if we’re focusing on this, then our focus is on the wrong things. God is the focal point. Not the people in his congregation. Sure, we want examples of how to live a holy life.  That’s natural. But, we’re disregarding a rather important fact. If we acknowledge that no one is perfect- Jesus has been identified as the only perfect being- then, by extension, no Christian can be perfect.

Side note: In Christ, we are made perfect. I am referring to the impossibility of worldly perfection.

We can make our faith look good. Sure, we’ve seen too many television shows about makeovers to not believe this. Following God is not about making any part of ourselves look good. It’s about revering and adhering to our Lord. When we fixate on the aesthetics of our faith, we risk replacing the importance of truly humbling ourselves to Him. We also do damage to the Church because we’re magnifying our hypocrisy. What if I told you that every single one of us is a hypocrite? We want to be as like Jesus as we possibly can; yet, we constantly fall short. If we didn’t fall short, we wouldn’t need Him. We get it wrong. We say the wrong thing. We make ourselves ugly, in appearance and soul, at times.  I could go on about how this does damage to our task of seeking disciples for Jesus, but what about to those who are already part of the flock?

There are two sides to the problem. Let’s start with those who are fixating on those who seem like they’re perfect Christians. Everyone’s circumstances are different. Everyone’s backgrounds are unique to them. Sure, there are a myriad of similarities, but there are also just as many differences. That’s good. God uses all of us. He uses our unique skillsets to serve His purpose. When we fixate on those who seem to do it better, we are shifting focus from serving God and worshipping Him, to creating a sort of idol in our fellow Christian. We do not know what goes on in their head. We do not know if they are truly following Him or wearing a mask. The second side of the problem is the people who attempt the illusion of perfection. Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m not telling anyone to not attempt to be the best version of themselves as possible. I’m merely pointing out that the illusion of perfection is not sustainable. Thousands of years later, Jesus’s perfection is still sustainable. Know why? Because it is not an illusion of perfection. It is absolute perfection. When we are more focused on how we present ourselves, we lose sight of Him. It undermines our walk with God. It undermines our ability to guide others to the flock, because we become less human and more hypocritical monsters.

So, how do we fix this? I could share verse after verse with you. Instead, just look back at who Jesus said He is. Because when it comes down to it, when we put too much of ourselves in it, to the point where others leave the Church or don’t come to Jesus, as byproducts of our own actions, we’re doing more harm to His Church.

Let’s change that. Let’s encourage each other’s walk, offering guidance where it is truly needed, and put a lot less of who we want God to be and lot more of who He tells us He is.

On Ruth: Our blessings

So she fell on her face, bowed down to the ground, and said to him, “Why have I found favor in your eyes, that you should take notice of me, since I am a foreigner?”

Ruth 2:11

Haven’t we all asked this question- in some manner- at various points in our lives? Haven’t we regarded our circumstances with unease and skepticism? Who am I Lord? What have I done? Even, is this a trick? How about, what’s the catch? Human beings tear themselves and each other down. Accepting God’s blessings is not always easy.

Let’s look at some scripture about blessings:

  • Proverbs 10:22 – The blessing of the Lord makes one rich, and He adds no sorrow with it
  • Exodus 23:25 – And ye shall serve the Lord your God, and he shall bless thy bread, and thy water, and I will take sickness away from the midst of thee.
  • Luke 6:22 – Blessed are ye, when men shall hate you, and when they shall reproach you, and cast out your name as evil, for the son of man’s sake.

As children, we are taught that what we have is what we earn. We earn good grades by studying and investing energy in our education. We earn paychecks by showing up and completing the job we were hired to do. We earn extra credit or bonuses. But can we earn God’s blessings? The answer we came up with depends on our understandings of God.

Point 1: We do not deserve God’s blessings.

In Ruth 3:10-11, Boaz told Ruth, “Blessed are you of the Lord, my daughter! For you have shown more kindness at the end than at the beginning, in that you did not go after young men, whether poor or rich. And now, my daughter, do not fear. I will do for you all that you request, for all the people of my town know that you are a virtuous woman.” Ruth toiled in the fields to help feed Naomi and herself. Now, if you’ll remember, Ruth was a widow from Moab who really did not have any perceived value. Even her mother-in-law had wanted Ruth to return home. Quite plainly, there was no way she could have earned the blessings she received through her own merits.

God does not create a value system for us to earn His grace. Rather, it is absolute submission and obedience to Him or we are set apart from Him (i.e. the separation of the Nonbeliever). God does not bless us because we have proven faithful. He does not reward us because we go through the Son to get to Him. Those are expectations placed on us. If we are to follow Him, the only reward- if you will- that we can expect is that our sins are no longer weighed against us because we have turned the bill over to Jesus. We do not deserve this, but have been given it all the same.

All things are meant for the glory of God. “And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose.” (Romans‬ ‭8:28‬). We are called to love Him, to accept what He sends us, whether they be- to our estimation- trials or benefits.

Point 2: We must change our perceptions of glory.

Since we cannot earn the Lord’s blessings, why do we receive them? Surely not because of our service to Him. Surely, not because we have gifts intrinsic to ourselves. God takes care of His flock. His blessings are sometimes hard to bear. His blessings are meant to forge us into what best serves His glory. We are on this earth to make disciples, to bring more souls to His flock.

When we look at our blessings, we must alter our perception. When we think about it, we envision happy things: a raise, an unexpected bonus, a book deal… so much. These are happy things. What about the times we lose? What about the times we lose our jobs? Where we go through the suffering? When events just do not go according to how we are expecting? All things to the glory of God.

God’s blessings are more than good or bad. Let’s look back at Ruth. She toiled in the fields, going behind the reapers to pick over the leftovers. Bare scraps. She tried to take care of Naomi. She struggled to take care of a woman who would have abandoned her. But God blessed her. Ruth’s is the bloodline that lead to David. Remember whose bloodline involves David? Jesus. God blessed her. He blesses us too.

By accepting our circumstances, whether good or bad, we start to see that God works through everything. He guides our circumstances to work towards His own designs. So, it does not matter. It is not a trick. There is no catch.